13. Decolonizing Editing - The FOLD

13. Decolonizing Editing

Session Description

In this important conversation, four editors discuss suggestions and practical ideas on how to improve the substantive editing and copy-editing processes to reflect more inclusive practices. What is an editor’s role and how can editors and copyeditors support the creation of art as language continues to evolve? Tackling issues related to culture, race, gender, disability and more with FOLD Executive Director Jael Richardson, publishing professionals andrea bennett, Iva Cheung, Jessica Johns, and Ronan Sadler bring their lived and professional experiences to an important discussion on critical approaches in editorial work.

How to Register

Events scheduled for May 1-15 are available via an all-access festival pass. The festival pass costs $39 and gives you access to a virtual festival platform, which includes an auditorium hosting forty virtual events, an exhibit hall with a live chat feature for communicating with vendors, and a lounge for engaging in discussions before and after events with other festival-goers.

Passholders will have be able to compete in the space for incredible prizes and will have access to the platform and all of the recorded festival events, as well as bonus content, until May 30, 2021. If the cost of the pass is prohibitive, please fill out the Patron Pass form, and a pass will be made available.

Featured Speaker(s)

A white non-binary individual with close-croppsed brown hair looks off into the distance and smiles. They are wearing a blue t-shirt and overalls.
andrea bennett
Bio
A young Asian woman wears a black and white scoop beck tank top and stands against a white background. She wears glasses.
Iva Cheung
Bio
An Indigenous woman with long dark hair stands against a city courtyard background. She wears glasses and Indigenous beaded feather earrings.
Jessica Johns
Bio
A black-and-white picture of a non-binary individual with glasses and short curly hair.
Ronan Sadler
Bio
A Black woman wearing green-rimmed glasses smiles at the camera. She wears a black turtleneck top.
Jael Richardson
Bio
A white non-binary individual with close-croppsed brown hair looks off into the distance and smiles. They are wearing a blue t-shirt and overalls.

andrea bennett

andrea bennett is the author of Like a Boy but Not a Boy, a book of essays out now with Arsenal Pulp Press.They are a National Magazine Award–winning writer and editor. They live in Powell River, BC, on the territory of the Tla’amin people, just a quick couple fjords/ferry rides north of Vancouver.

A young Asian woman wears a black and white scoop beck tank top and stands against a white background. She wears glasses.

Iva Cheung

Iva Cheung (MPub, PhD) is a Certified Professional Editor, indexer, and researcher who worked as an in-house editorial coordinator at Douglas & McIntyre and Greystone Books and now freelances, specializing in plain language editing and training. She is an active member of Editors Canada and has won the Tom Fairley Award for Editorial Excellence, the Karen Virag award for promoting the editing profession, and the President’s Award for Volunteer Service. She is an advocate for accessibility and equity in editing and publishing and co-creates communications with members of underrepresented communities.

An Indigenous woman with long dark hair stands against a city courtyard background. She wears glasses and Indigenous beaded feather earrings.

Jessica Johns

Jessica Johns is a nehiyaw aunty with English-Irish ancestry and a member of Sucker Creek First Nation in Treaty 8 territory in Northern Alberta. She is the Managing Editor for Room Magazine and a co-organizer of the Indigenous Brilliance reading series. Her debut poetry chapbook, How Not to Spill, co-won the 2019 BP Nichol Chapbook Award, and her short story “Bad Cree” won the 2020 Writers’ Trust Journey Prize and won silver at the 2020 National Magazine Awards. Her first book, Bad Cree, is forthcoming with HarperCollins Canada in 2023.

A black-and-white picture of a non-binary individual with glasses and short curly hair.

Ronan Sadler

Ronan Sadler is the Editorial Coordinator at Carina Press, Harlequin’s digital-first imprint. After a Master’s in Critical Disability Studies, Ronan left academia and returned to their first love: stories. They joined the Carina Press editorial team as a freelancer for two years before moving in-house.

A Black woman wearing green-rimmed glasses smiles at the camera. She wears a black turtleneck top.

Jael Richardson

Jael Richardson is the author of The Stone Thrower, a book columnist on CBC’s q, and the founder and the Executive Director for the Festival of Literary Diversity (FOLD). Her debut novel, Gutter Child, was published in January 2021 with HarperCollins Canada. She lives in Brampton, Ontario.

The FOLD is a remarkable and wonderful event for authors and attendees alike. What an amazing community, dedicated to the vital need for inclusive stories and the critical role they play in building a better world.

Soraya Chemaly, author of Rage Becomes Her

Field Guide to the North American Teenager is my first novel and FOLD was my first Canadian literary festival. While American and Canadian culture overlap quite a bit, especially when it comes to bookshelves, Canadian literature is unique and I was very heartened by to be embraced by that community I consider home despite residing in the US. It was a homecoming I didn’t know I needed!

Ben Philippe, author of Field Guide to the North American Teenager

The Festival of Literary Diversity was an absolute joy–the organizers thought of *everything* and by anticipating authors’ needs, they freed us to focus on connecting with the audience and each other. There was no pretension, no posturing–just very genuine conversations with invested writers and engaged readers.

Zetta Elliott, author of Dragons in a Bag

I have been to a lot of writers festivals and the FOLD is definitely near the top of the list of those I want to be invited back to.

Harold Johnson, author of the memoirs Clifford and Firewater

Being part of such a clearly diverse, inclusive and mutually respectful group was thrilling and inspiring: a glimpse of a better world.

Kathy Page, author of Dear Evelyn, winner of the 2018 Rogers Writers’ Trust Fiction Prize

Wherever I go in Canada and find another writer of colour, we eventually end up gushing about how great the FOLD is, how by normalizing diversity it liberates us to talk to audiences about craft. It’s hard to imagine the literary landscape returning to a prehistoric pre-FOLD era.

Ian Williams, Author of the Giller Prize-winning novel Reproduction

FOLD is a festival experience unlike any other I’ve had. The FOLD team strive to create a space that’s welcoming and engaging, while allowing for curiosity, ingenuity and the fostering of real community – and they succeed, every year.

Alicia Elliott, author of A Mind Spread Out On The Ground

The FOLD is one of the most important literary events on this continent. By focusing on diverse voices and giving authors space to share their stories and speak their truths, it is revolutionizing the writing and storytelling realm as we know it.

Waubgeshig Rice, author of Moon Of The Crusted Snow

Being part of the FOLD community has provided me with a strong sense of belonging. Sharing diverse stories and listening to different voices that broaden my understanding of the world has impacted me as a person and motivated me as a writer.

Ann Y.K. Choi, author of Kay’s Lucky Coin Variety

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